Box 569 Heriot Bay, British Columbia, Canada V0P 1H0
North America: 1.800.307.3982 | Local & Overseas: 1.250.285.2121


We are here to assist you in any way we can.
North America: 1.800.307.3982
Local & Overseas: 1.250.285.2121
[email protected]



Ocean

News, views & stories from the realm of the whales.

Life in Between: The Intertidal Zone

November 20th, 2018

Many people come to kayak on northern Vancouver Island in hopes of seeing wildlife. We are frequently asked questions about sea-dwellers (such as whales, dolphins, and seals) and landlubbers (like wolves, bears and eagles). But what many fail to appreciate ahead of time is the vast diversity of life found in the intertidal zone. Our hope here is to shed…

The Great Bear Rainforest: A Swell Place

October 20th, 2018

Nothing makes a Spirit of the West kayak guide get all mystical like the Great Bear Rainforest. Ask any of our guides about the Great Bear Rainforest Expedition and they’ll get a far-off look in their eyes, breathe deeply, and say something akin to “ah, yes, the Great Bear.” To a kayak guide, our most northerly expedition (in the Central…

Seaweeds – Where Nori Comes From

May 3rd, 2018

A common feature found on our kayak tours around Vancouver Island is the presence of seaweeds in their many shapes and forms. Marine ‘macroalgae’, or seaweeds, are plant-like organisms that live attached to rocks in the intertidal zone, in giant underwater forests, or floating on the ocean’s surface. They can be very tiny, or very large – growing to over…

Learn About the Pacific Harbour Seal

January 21st, 2018

On many of our sea kayaking tours around Vancouver Island, we have the opportunity to view Habour seals in their natural environment. Our guests often ask about these amazing creatures, so we thought we would pass along some facts about seals for anyone who might be interested! Seals belong to a group of mammals called Pinnipeds, meaning ‘feather foot’, which…

Humpback whales of Vancouver Island

March 28th, 2016

The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) was given its common name because of the shape of its dorsal fin and its unique diving behaviour. Its scientific name, Megaptera, means “large-winged” and refers to its long, white, wing-like flippers. These fins can be as big as one-third of the animal’s body length and give incredible maneuverability, even being used to swim backwards…

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